I'd like regular ancestral cooking emails!

Healing is hard. . But, for us, the possibility of achieving it naturally far, far outweighs the ‘sentence’ that you can end up with if you go the standard medical route. . We embarked on the GAPS protocol as part of our quest to heal our son. All three of us learnt so much in those two years. And it was a platform for more healing, which continues to this day. . Listen to today’s @ancestralkitchenpodcast to hear a personal take on two years of the GAPS diet. We talk about why we started the protocol, how we organised our kitchen, our practical routines, what we found challenging, what results we experienced, how we transitioned off GAPS and how our healing has moved on since then. . If you’ve ever thought “perhaps GAPS is for me?” or wondered about the power of healing diets, this is the episode for you.

Healing is hard.
.
But, for us, the possibility of achieving it naturally far, far outweighs the ‘sentence’ that you can end up with if you go the standard medical route.
.
We embarked on the GAPS protocol as part of our quest to heal our son. All three of us learnt so much in those two years. And it was a platform for more healing, which continues to this day.
.
Listen to today’s @ancestralkitchenpodcast to hear a personal take on two years of the GAPS diet. We talk about why we started the protocol, how we organised our kitchen, our practical routines, what we found challenging, what results we experienced, how we transitioned off GAPS and how our healing has moved on since then.
.
If you’ve ever thought “perhaps GAPS is for me?” or wondered about the power of healing diets, this is the episode for you.

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#59 – Alison & Rob’s Personal Experience with GAPS

Have you ever thought the GAPS protocol might be for you? Are you considering trying it, or you’ve just heard about it and wonder how it fits into a healing journey? Are you struggling to bring grains into your diet without digestive issues, or wondering what you can do to replenish a gut system damaged by antibiotics? This is the episode for you.… Read More

Sometimes, leftovers outrank the original dish, right?! . That’s what we have here with goetta, a Cincinnati dish made from oats, pork and onions. I stuffed all our leftovers in a loaf tin, let them set, then cut slices off. Now I’m frying them in lard. And as I heard @sandorkraut say on a recent @taste podcast, “Everything is better with lard”! . More pics in my story today. Check my post two back for more goetta details.

Sometimes, leftovers outrank the original dish, right?!
.
That’s what we have here with goetta, a Cincinnati dish made from oats, pork and onions. I stuffed all our leftovers in a loaf tin, let them set, then cut slices off. Now I’m frying them in lard. And as I heard @sandorkraut say on a recent @taste podcast, “Everything is better with lard”!
.
More pics in my story today. Check my post two back for more goetta details.

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They’re alive! Microbes, doing their job in my ancestral ale, just like they would have done in the kitchens of females in my home country, the UK, five hundred years ago. . This ale is kitchen-made, grain malted at home, starter culture created here, glass bowls, saucepans and jars used. . I learn something new with every batch. This time, I’m using the spent grain in three, quite different, sourdough breads. I’ve taken tonnes of video…you can see it all in my story today.

They’re alive! Microbes, doing their job in my ancestral ale, just like they would have done in the kitchens of females in my home country, the UK, five hundred years ago.
.
This ale is kitchen-made, grain malted at home, starter culture created here, glass bowls, saucepans and jars used.
.
I learn something new with every batch. This time, I’m using the spent grain in three, quite different, sourdough breads. I’ve taken tonnes of video…you can see it all in my story today.

Read More

Food that makes you feel at home is so important. This dish, goetta, was invented by German immigrants to Cincinnati. It’s still made there and often eaters think it actually comes from Germany…but there’s no dish like it there! It was a Cincinnati creation; made to help people (who’d transported their entire life half way around the world) feel at ‘home’. . It’s pork, long-cooked in water, shredded, then added back to the broth created. After this, onions, celery and (my favourite!!) oats are added. You cook it until your spoon stands up in the mix. . Gosh, it’s good. . Comfort. In. A. Bowl. . We ate it with cauliflower and a glass of ancestral ale (oats in there too!). See my story today for lots of pictures (including the spoon standing up in my pot!). . My newsletter goes out tomorrow – if you’re not on it and want to be you can find the details in my story today or by clicking on the link in my profile.

Food that makes you feel at home is so important. This dish, goetta, was invented by German immigrants to Cincinnati. It’s still made there and often eaters think it actually comes from Germany…but there’s no dish like it there! It was a Cincinnati creation; made to help people (who’d transported their entire life half way around the world) feel at ‘home’.
.
It’s pork, long-cooked in water, shredded, then added back to the broth created. After this, onions, celery and (my favourite!!) oats are added. You cook it until your spoon stands up in the mix.
.
Gosh, it’s good.
.
Comfort. In. A. Bowl.
.
We ate it with cauliflower and a glass of ancestral ale (oats in there too!). See my story today for lots of pictures (including the spoon standing up in my pot!).
.
My newsletter goes out tomorrow – if you’re not on it and want to be you can find the details in my story today or by clicking on the link in my profile.

Read More

Two ingredients, old bread and sugar, and you can have Russian Bread Kvass. . I find home-made sourdough rye and some very dark brown sugar pretty unbeatable taste-wise. And I use the bread cubes again and again, brew after brew, so that they become a bit like kefir grains – a colony of probiotic yeasts and bacteria. . Here are the said bread cubes being filtered out as I pour the fermented liquid into a swing-top bottle for a second fermentation. . My favourite flavouring for this second ferment is raisins and mint. But orange and ginger are good too. . Some more pictures in my story today and the recipe (which includes videos) is the top link in my profile.

Two ingredients, old bread and sugar, and you can have Russian Bread Kvass.
.
I find home-made sourdough rye and some very dark brown sugar pretty unbeatable taste-wise. And I use the bread cubes again and again, brew after brew, so that they become a bit like kefir grains – a colony of probiotic yeasts and bacteria.
.
Here are the said bread cubes being filtered out as I pour the fermented liquid into a swing-top bottle for a second fermentation.
.
My favourite flavouring for this second ferment is raisins and mint. But orange and ginger are good too.
.
Some more pictures in my story today and the recipe (which includes videos) is the top link in my profile.

Read More

#58 – Ancestral Cooking for Schools & Retreats with Hilary Boynton

Hilary Boynton is the creator of the School of Lunch, a week long academy held a few times a year that teaches attendees from around the world how to put together incredible nourishing ancestral traditional food programs that they can use in whatever application they need – in running a school lunch program which is what Hilary does in California, in a business, for retreats or wellness spaces, at home or wherever they wish to implement a meal program. In this episode I got to sit down with Hilary and ask her to give me a peek into what happens at their academy.… Read More

My kitchen has its own music. The hissing is usually the sauerkraut. The fizzing is the water kefir. And this morning, as I type, my boza is singing to me with large gloopy pops as the fermentation gasses make their way up through the millet to the surface. . I’m looking forward to tasting this batch. The microbes create the most amazing thick, sweet yet tart drink that fizzes on my tongue! . There are some videos/pictures of the process in my story today. And if you want more, you can see how much I love this drink in my highlight :-)

My kitchen has its own music. The hissing is usually the sauerkraut. The fizzing is the water kefir. And this morning, as I type, my boza is singing to me with large gloopy pops as the fermentation gasses make their way up through the millet to the surface.
.
I’m looking forward to tasting this batch. The microbes create the most amazing thick, sweet yet tart drink that fizzes on my tongue!
.
There are some videos/pictures of the process in my story today. And if you want more, you can see how much I love this drink in my highlight 🙂

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The staying power of broth: You know when you fill a bucket with water and then spin it around in a circle so it goes upside down over your head and the water magically (well, magically for us non-physicists!) stays put? . I *so* wanted to do that with this cauliflower soup. I would have laid money on it working. All thanks to the power of pork bone broth! . Bone broth is pure majesty – listen to @ancestralkitchenpodcast #26 to hear @farmandhearth and I give the low down on this amazing ancestral food that can be made for pennies (or cents…depending on where you are!). . In my story today you can be wowed by broth beauty. I jiggle it for you. Then I tip the soup up on video so you can marvel at it. Do go watch ;-) . BTW – the soup is from the great book Better Broths and Healing Tonics. We’ll have an interview with one of the creators of this bible of broth on the podcast later in the year. If you have questions on broth you’d like answered, let me know.

The staying power of broth: You know when you fill a bucket with water and then spin it around in a circle so it goes upside down over your head and the water magically (well, magically for us non-physicists!) stays put?
.
I *so* wanted to do that with this cauliflower soup. I would have laid money on it working. All thanks to the power of pork bone broth!
.
Bone broth is pure majesty – listen to @ancestralkitchenpodcast #26 to hear @farmandhearth and I give the low down on this amazing ancestral food that can be made for pennies (or cents…depending on where you are!).
.
In my story today you can be wowed by broth beauty. I jiggle it for you. Then I tip the soup up on video so you can marvel at it. Do go watch 😉
.
BTW – the soup is from the great book Better Broths and Healing Tonics. We’ll have an interview with one of the creators of this bible of broth on the podcast later in the year. If you have questions on broth you’d like answered, let me know.

Read More