I'd like regular ancestral cooking emails!

Llymru is a Welsh oat ferment. It is similar to sowans, the oat fermentation method native to Scotland, but uses whey or buttermilk to start the ferment (there’s a lot of good milk in Wales so a dairy starter would have been natural). . When finished, it sets into a beautiful jelly which you can slice. Here I’ve served it with local honey and some borage flowers from the garden (I still have flowers in my garden!!). . Check my story today to watch it wobbling! I can’t keep my eyes off it! . If you’re interested in traditional oat fermentation, you can learn via my course Sowans: The Scottish Oat Ferment over at @thefermentationschool (there’s a link in my profile)

Llymru is a Welsh oat ferment. It is similar to sowans, the oat fermentation method native to Scotland, but uses whey or buttermilk to start the ferment (there’s a lot of good milk in Wales so a dairy starter would have been natural).
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When finished, it sets into a beautiful jelly which you can slice. Here I’ve served it with local honey and some borage flowers from the garden (I still have flowers in my garden!!).
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Check my story today to watch it wobbling! I can’t keep my eyes off it!
.
If you’re interested in traditional oat fermentation, you can learn via my course Sowans: The Scottish Oat Ferment over at @thefermentationschool (there’s a link in my profile)

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How many times have you heard this: “Yes, regenerative agriculture’s all well and good, but you couldn’t feed the world that way”. . Today, in the podcast, we speak to the man who is building a roadmap to show us that *it could*. . Sir Patrick Holden runs the Sustainable Food Trust who have just published a report that shows how Britain could feed itself using pesticide and fertiliser-free, animal-involved agriculture whilst feeding grain to humans, not animals. . We talk about all the details, how this can be taken global, lab meat, how we can create change as individuals and much more. . We’re so grateful to Sir Patrick for sharing his 50-year experience as both a dairy farmer and an activist. Subscribe to @ancestralkitchenpodcast from your podcast app or stream/download from the link in my profile.

How many times have you heard this: “Yes, regenerative agriculture’s all well and good, but you couldn’t feed the world that way”.
.
Today, in the podcast, we speak to the man who is building a roadmap to show us that *it could*.
.
Sir Patrick Holden runs the Sustainable Food Trust who have just published a report that shows how Britain could feed itself using pesticide and fertiliser-free, animal-involved agriculture whilst feeding grain to humans, not animals.
.
We talk about all the details, how this can be taken global, lab meat, how we can create change as individuals and much more.
.
We’re so grateful to Sir Patrick for sharing his 50-year experience as both a dairy farmer and an activist. Subscribe to @ancestralkitchenpodcast from your podcast app or stream/download from the link in my profile.

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#46 – How To Feed The World Sustainably With Sir Patrick Holden

In this episode I talk to Sir Patrick Holden, head of The Sustainable Food Trust and 50-year farmer and sustainable food activist. You’ll hear us talk about his latest research into how the UK could feed itself using fertiliser/pesticide-free sustainable agriculture (with no grain-fed animals!), the tools to take this global, and how this lifetime campaigner for sustainable animal-involved agriculture feels about lab meat, supermarkets, ground-up change and much more.… Read More

Brewing ale (like baking bread) used to be a household task, performed by women using kitchen equipment and shared yeast. . Then, in England at least, along came hops, industrialisation, marginalisation and what followed were large-scale operations, run by men. That’s now been honed into the brewing world we see as normal. . I don’t want to partake in industrial bread, with it’s whipping, chemical additives and packaging so why should I do so for alcohol? . Bringing ale back into my household, making it accessible and successful is proving quite a ride! Reading, guessing, experimenting, tasting, revising…over and over again. . Here’s the latest batch, brewing with…shock, horror… commercial yeast. I’m doing it to try and understand whether my attempts at home yeast (which have been many and varied) are making my beer taste the way it does or whether home-malting or my equipment makes the difference. . Check out the layer on the top of this ferment. The yeasts, not wanting any competition from opportunistic bacteria, have created a physical barrier to keep the sugary grain liquid all to themselves! . If you want to see more of what I’ve been up to, check out my ancestral ale highlight or support me by becoming a patron of @ancestralkitchenpodcast where I’ve recently shared what I’ve been up to.

Brewing ale (like baking bread) used to be a household task, performed by women using kitchen equipment and shared yeast.
.
Then, in England at least, along came hops, industrialisation, marginalisation and what followed were large-scale operations, run by men. That’s now been honed into the brewing world we see as normal.
.
I don’t want to partake in industrial bread, with it’s whipping, chemical additives and packaging so why should I do so for alcohol?
.
Bringing ale back into my household, making it accessible and successful is proving quite a ride! Reading, guessing, experimenting, tasting, revising…over and over again.
.
Here’s the latest batch, brewing with…shock, horror… commercial yeast. I’m doing it to try and understand whether my attempts at home yeast (which have been many and varied) are making my beer taste the way it does or whether home-malting or my equipment makes the difference.
.
Check out the layer on the top of this ferment. The yeasts, not wanting any competition from opportunistic bacteria, have created a physical barrier to keep the sugary grain liquid all to themselves!
.
If you want to see more of what I’ve been up to, check out my ancestral ale highlight or support me by becoming a patron of @ancestralkitchenpodcast where I’ve recently shared what I’ve been up to.

Read More

Keeping warm in winter has always been a challenge for me. But here, as in many areas of life, ancestral wisdom has taught me so much. . I’m writing a newsletter to go out tomorrow which will share what I do – with food, drink and routines – to help keep warm. And it’ll include details of this fabulous beef and barley stew. . You can get on my mailing list via the link in my profile or by typing ancestralkitchen.com/newsletter into your browser.

Keeping warm in winter has always been a challenge for me. But here, as in many areas of life, ancestral wisdom has taught me so much.
.
I’m writing a newsletter to go out tomorrow which will share what I do – with food, drink and routines – to help keep warm. And it’ll include details of this fabulous beef and barley stew.
.
You can get on my mailing list via the link in my profile or by typing ancestralkitchen.com/newsletter into your browser.

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The tin you bake in makes a big difference to your loaf. Two identical rye sourdoughs here, one cooked in a ceramic baker, the other a metal ‘pullman’-style pan. . We’re so used to seeing tall rye bread with straight edges, so the pullman pan, though non-stick (which isn’t my favourite), creates such a pleasing loaf. . If you’ve been contemplating my course, Rye Sourdough Bread: Mastering The Basics, don’t delay! @thefermentationschool’s 50%-off sale ends today, Monday 28th at 11:59pm PST. There’s a link to the course with the discount already applied in my story today.

The tin you bake in makes a big difference to your loaf. Two identical rye sourdoughs here, one cooked in a ceramic baker, the other a metal ‘pullman’-style pan.
.
We’re so used to seeing tall rye bread with straight edges, so the pullman pan, though non-stick (which isn’t my favourite), creates such a pleasing loaf.
.
If you’ve been contemplating my course, Rye Sourdough Bread: Mastering The Basics, don’t delay! @thefermentationschool’s 50%-off sale ends today, Monday 28th at 11:59pm PST. There’s a link to the course with the discount already applied in my story today.

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Fermented Chestnuts! I discovered these by accident (“I wonder what’ll happen if I stick these chestnuts in some honey and put them somewhere warm?!”) last year and they were a revelation…so, of course, I couldn’t wait to do them again this year! . They are boozy (in a delicious mead way), spicy and soft. I’m planning to cover them in home-made bean-to-bar chocolate and then feel like a goddess as I eat them over the festive period! . If you want to have a go, score, roast and peel your chestnuts. Take time over it, so as to get as many as possible in one piece. Add to a jar along with some whole spices. Top up with a 50/50 (by weight) mix of honey (preferably unpasteurised) and water. Try to get the chestnuts under the liquid. Put a loose lid on. Keep somewhere warm (ideally 22-28C) and stir gently every day. They’ll take a good couple of weeks…keep tasting the liquid to judge how they are coming on! . I’ll put more pics in my story today and save as a highlight too.

Fermented Chestnuts! I discovered these by accident (“I wonder what’ll happen if I stick these chestnuts in some honey and put them somewhere warm?!”) last year and they were a revelation…so, of course, I couldn’t wait to do them again this year!
.
They are boozy (in a delicious mead way), spicy and soft. I’m planning to cover them in home-made bean-to-bar chocolate and then feel like a goddess as I eat them over the festive period!
.
If you want to have a go, score, roast and peel your chestnuts. Take time over it, so as to get as many as possible in one piece. Add to a jar along with some whole spices. Top up with a 50/50 (by weight) mix of honey (preferably unpasteurised) and water. Try to get the chestnuts under the liquid. Put a loose lid on. Keep somewhere warm (ideally 22-28C) and stir gently every day. They’ll take a good couple of weeks…keep tasting the liquid to judge how they are coming on!
.
I’ll put more pics in my story today and save as a highlight too.

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Think fermentation’s just about kraut, kombucha and sourdough? What about extending it to rubbish; to your kitchen waste?!! These two buckets and the bag of inoculated bran next to them have given me an amazing way to transform my food scraps, through fermentation, into compost. . Once the ferment is done, I dig it into my container-garden pots. The vegetables that I’ve grown since I started with this method, called Bokashi, have been much bigger, happier and delicious! . Today’s @ancestralkitchenpodcast is all about Bokashi. It will teach you everything you need to know about what it is, how it works, how you can use it in both a tiny town apartment and a large homestead and what the benefits are to you, your plants, the soil and the environment. . @farmandhearth and I, thanks to @teraganix have a 2-bucket Essential Bokashi set worth $126 to give away (to someone in the US or Canada). To enter please tag someone who you think would love to get started with Bokashi in the comments of this post. The competition will close next Tues 29th at midnight US time. . Listen to the @ancestralkitchenpodcast episode to find out more by searching for us in your podcast app or by streaming/downloading from the link in my profile.

Think fermentation’s just about kraut, kombucha and sourdough? What about extending it to rubbish; to your kitchen waste?!! These two buckets and the bag of inoculated bran next to them have given me an amazing way to transform my food scraps, through fermentation, into compost.
.
Once the ferment is done, I dig it into my container-garden pots. The vegetables that I’ve grown since I started with this method, called Bokashi, have been much bigger, happier and delicious!
.
Today’s @ancestralkitchenpodcast is all about Bokashi. It will teach you everything you need to know about what it is, how it works, how you can use it in both a tiny town apartment and a large homestead and what the benefits are to you, your plants, the soil and the environment.
.
@farmandhearth and I, thanks to @teraganix have a 2-bucket Essential Bokashi set worth $126 to give away (to someone in the US or Canada). To enter please tag someone who you think would love to get started with Bokashi in the comments of this post. The competition will close next Tues 29th at midnight US time.
.
Listen to the @ancestralkitchenpodcast episode to find out more by searching for us in your podcast app or by streaming/downloading from the link in my profile.

Read More