I'd like regular ancestral cooking emails!

When someone with as much passion for photography as I’ve passion for sourdough spelt pizza makes and then takes her camera to my recipe, this is the heavenly result! . Becky from @thestoriedrecipe.podcast interviewed me last week and she, as a complete newbie to sourdough, made my pizza. What a result! Swipe for more pics. . You can listen to the podcast episode, titled “What is Ancestral Eating” by searching for The Storied Recipe in your podcast app, or by clicking on the link in my profile. It’s partly my story, partly me answering Becky’s insightful questions and partly sourdough chat!

When someone with as much passion for photography as I’ve passion for sourdough spelt pizza makes and then takes her camera to my recipe, this is the heavenly result!
.
Becky from @thestoriedrecipe.podcast interviewed me last week and she, as a complete newbie to sourdough, made my pizza. What a result! Swipe for more pics.
.
You can listen to the podcast episode, titled “What is Ancestral Eating” by searching for The Storied Recipe in your podcast app, or by clicking on the link in my profile. It’s partly my story, partly me answering Becky’s insightful questions and partly sourdough chat!

Read More

If you want to bake with rye, listen to this week’s podcast. . In it, I talk through the four reasons I love rye sourdough: Its gluten content, its taste, the amazing, stress-free, starter it makes and the ease of working with it. I answer questions on mixing, ageing, health benefits, bringing out flavour and much more. . And I share a discount code for my new course Rye Sourdough Bread: Mastering The Basics, a thorough, hands-on course with over two hours of video that’ll walk you through understanding rye baking, creating and maintaining a starter, baking two wonderful sourdough loaves and equip you with delicious discard recipes. . Download the episode via your podcast app, by searching for Ancestral Kitchen podcast, or stream/download from my site (link in profile).

If you want to bake with rye, listen to this week’s podcast.
.
In it, I talk through the four reasons I love rye sourdough: Its gluten content, its taste, the amazing, stress-free, starter it makes and the ease of working with it. I answer questions on mixing, ageing, health benefits, bringing out flavour and much more.
.
And I share a discount code for my new course Rye Sourdough Bread: Mastering The Basics, a thorough, hands-on course with over two hours of video that’ll walk you through understanding rye baking, creating and maintaining a starter, baking two wonderful sourdough loaves and equip you with delicious discard recipes.
.
Download the episode via your podcast app, by searching for Ancestral Kitchen podcast, or stream/download from my site (link in profile).

Read More

#41 -Wholegrain Sourdough Rye: Mastering The Basics

Why am I so obsessed with rye? It’s because I love it… Rye is just so special. – Alison Where to begin with sourdough rye bread? This is a topic that both Alison and Andrea have received so many questions about. Alison … Read More

This bread was made using ale yeast I grew at home. . Last week I made ale. After brewing I decided to try using a bit of the same home-nurtured starter to make bread. It worked a treat – this beautiful wholegrain spelt loaf came from it. . Although I made this ale starter from rye flour, just like I do my sourdough starter, the two mixes are quite different. Ale brewing uses yeasts and avoids bacteria. This is different to a sourdough starter which encourages both yeasts *and* bacteria. So using my ale starter in this bread meant the flavour was different. . And you know what? I didn’t really like it! I am so used to sourdough and I missed the flavours the bacteria produce! . How quickly we get used to tastes! Have you had that? You try something you haven’t eaten for ages and you wonder how on earth you ever used to like it?! . I’m also guessing that this bread isn’t as nutritious, as it is lacking the transformations that the bacteria in a sourdough culture provide…

This bread was made using ale yeast I grew at home.
.
Last week I made ale. After brewing I decided to try using a bit of the same home-nurtured starter to make bread. It worked a treat – this beautiful wholegrain spelt loaf came from it.
.
Although I made this ale starter from rye flour, just like I do my sourdough starter, the two mixes are quite different. Ale brewing uses yeasts and avoids bacteria. This is different to a sourdough starter which encourages both yeasts *and* bacteria. So using my ale starter in this bread meant the flavour was different.
.
And you know what? I didn’t really like it! I am so used to sourdough and I missed the flavours the bacteria produce!
.
How quickly we get used to tastes! Have you had that? You try something you haven’t eaten for ages and you wonder how on earth you ever used to like it?!
.
I’m also guessing that this bread isn’t as nutritious, as it is lacking the transformations that the bacteria in a sourdough culture provide…

Read More

Ancestral ale made with Italian rye and my own ale yeast! . I’m so excited to get back to traditional ale-making. I’ve used quite a few starters in the eighteen months I’ve been playing with this – sourdough, mead, boza…yet I knew I wanted to have a go at making my own dedicated starter from scratch. . What I needed was a yeast (not bacteria) dominant starter. Reading about Norwegian techniques I knew I could use flour and water, but that I also needed something to suppress potential bacteria. I didn’t want to use hops – they only came into ale/beer in the 1500s. I plumped for the locally-abundant anti-bacterial rosemary and boiled the herb in the water I used for every refresh. . Along with rosemary, I also use bacteria-inhibiting salt and yeast-encouraging sugar. After 10 days I had a strong yeasty starter (pic in my story) which I then used with grain I’d malted myself to make this ale. . Pictured here are three bottles about to go into a second ferment, one flavoured with cloves, another fennel seeds and the last elderflower and rosehip. . I’m reading all about how women dominated brewing in England until the commercialisation that happened after the Black Death. Every page I read and every experiment I do connects me to those who came before me, whose DNA is in my own. . I’ll put more details and pictures in my story today. There is an ‘ancestral ale’ highlight if you want to follow along in my journey.

Ancestral ale made with Italian rye and my own ale yeast!
.
I’m so excited to get back to traditional ale-making. I’ve used quite a few starters in the eighteen months I’ve been playing with this – sourdough, mead, boza…yet I knew I wanted to have a go at making my own dedicated starter from scratch.
.
What I needed was a yeast (not bacteria) dominant starter. Reading about Norwegian techniques I knew I could use flour and water, but that I also needed something to suppress potential bacteria. I didn’t want to use hops – they only came into ale/beer in the 1500s. I plumped for the locally-abundant anti-bacterial rosemary and boiled the herb in the water I used for every refresh.
.
Along with rosemary, I also use bacteria-inhibiting salt and yeast-encouraging sugar. After 10 days I had a strong yeasty starter (pic in my story) which I then used with grain I’d malted myself to make this ale.
.
Pictured here are three bottles about to go into a second ferment, one flavoured with cloves, another fennel seeds and the last elderflower and rosehip.
.
I’m reading all about how women dominated brewing in England until the commercialisation that happened after the Black Death. Every page I read and every experiment I do connects me to those who came before me, whose DNA is in my own.
.
I’ll put more details and pictures in my story today. There is an ‘ancestral ale’ highlight if you want to follow along in my journey.

Read More

Beets grown in fermented kitchen waste! . Bokashi is a Japanese fermentation technique that for me, in my tiny kitchen/container garden, has helped me: . A – recycle virtually all of my kitchen scraps B – make compost with no outside space needed C – avoid buying new bags of compost this year, and D – make my vegetables pretty amazing! . I’m so excited about it, that I’m lining up an expert to come and explain all on the podcast. Watch out for interview later in the year. . If you bokashi, I’d love to hear how you use it. . More pictures of happy gardeners and veg in my story today!

Beets grown in fermented kitchen waste!
.
Bokashi is a Japanese fermentation technique that for me, in my tiny kitchen/container garden, has helped me:
.
A – recycle virtually all of my kitchen scraps
B – make compost with no outside space needed
C – avoid buying new bags of compost this year, and
D – make my vegetables pretty amazing!
.
I’m so excited about it, that I’m lining up an expert to come and explain all on the podcast. Watch out for interview later in the year.
.
If you bokashi, I’d love to hear how you use it.
.
More pictures of happy gardeners and veg in my story today!

Read More

Can you imagine a school canteen serving beet kvass, organ meats, bone broth and raw fermented dairy?! 26,000 meals like that in their first year?! . When Hilary Boynton of @school_of_lunch_ saw the food at her kids school going downhill, she went in and took over, and boy, how she took over…transforming the kitchen into an ancestral food heaven. . In today’s @ancestralkitchenpodcast, @farmandhearth and I pin the amazingness that is Hilary down. We talk about how she has and continues to do it, what changes she’s seen in the children and families around her, how she’s taking her teaching global and how she stays healthy herself (did I mention she’s written a book and cares for six children too?!) . Hilary is a true trailblazer – there was no model for what she did, and despite the prevailing profit-driven food crisis she gets up everyday and does what she can with bells on! . She’s a total inspiration to me. I’m getting goosebumps just writing this!! Thank you Hilary :-) . You can find the episode by searching for Ancestral Kitchen Podcast in your podcast app or you can stream/download from my site, the link’s in my profile.

Can you imagine a school canteen serving beet kvass, organ meats, bone broth and raw fermented dairy?! 26,000 meals like that in their first year?!
.
When Hilary Boynton of @school_of_lunch_ saw the food at her kids school going downhill, she went in and took over, and boy, how she took over…transforming the kitchen into an ancestral food heaven.
.
In today’s @ancestralkitchenpodcast, @farmandhearth
and I pin the amazingness that is Hilary down. We talk about how she has and continues to do it, what changes she’s seen in the children and families around her, how she’s taking her teaching global and how she stays healthy herself (did I mention she’s written a book and cares for six children too?!)
.
Hilary is a true trailblazer – there was no model for what she did, and despite the prevailing profit-driven food crisis she gets up everyday and does what she can with bells on!
.
She’s a total inspiration to me. I’m getting goosebumps just writing this!! Thank you Hilary 🙂
.
You can find the episode by searching for Ancestral Kitchen Podcast in your podcast app or you can stream/download from my site, the link’s in my profile.

Read More