I'd like regular ancestral cooking emails!

#10 – Elly from Elly’s Everday; Sourdough-Baking & Soap-Making

If you’re interested in whole grain sourdough baking (or soap-making) Elly is the one to know! She has two fantastic You Tube channels with wonderfully clear, non-nonsense recipes. Listen to us quiz her on all things sourdough *and* get a chat in about making your own soap too!… Read More

This is sourdough oat polenta bread. That sounds like three different foods in one, right? Well, it kinda is… . I fermented the ground wholegrain oats for a couple of days (inoculated with some sourdough starter). When fizzy, I cooked them up with water and made a polenta-style dish which we ate like porridge. . I then stuffed the (intentional) leftovers into a small loaf tin and packed them down! A hour or so later and I turned out this :-) . We’ll slice it throughout the week to make an easy breakfast/supper and if I’ve got more time, I’ll probably fry some slices in ghee or lard. . I plan to include this process in a set of three videos I’m hoping to film over the summer. They’ll walk you through the whole fermenting – polenta-ing – bread-ing process. . In addition to IG, you can now sign up to my (forthcoming) mailing list (link in profile) if you want to keep in touch with my kitchen.

This is sourdough oat polenta bread. That sounds like three different foods in one, right? Well, it kinda is…
.
I fermented the ground wholegrain oats for a couple of days (inoculated with some sourdough starter). When fizzy, I cooked them up with water and made a polenta-style dish which we ate like porridge.
.
I then stuffed the (intentional) leftovers into a small loaf tin and packed them down! A hour or so later and I turned out this 🙂
.
We’ll slice it throughout the week to make an easy breakfast/supper and if I’ve got more time, I’ll probably fry some slices in ghee or lard.
.
I plan to include this process in a set of three videos I’m hoping to film over the summer. They’ll walk you through the whole fermenting – polenta-ing – bread-ing process.
.
In addition to IG, you can now sign up to my (forthcoming) mailing list (link in profile) if you want to keep in touch with my kitchen.

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If you fancy creating an ancient Turkish probiotic millet drink, Boza, in your kitchen (that is gluten-free, lectin-free, dairy-free and also happens to be vegan) then the first video course I’ve ever created is for you! . It’s up on my website now. There are 35+ minutes of video that’ll talk you through it, 2 downloadable .pdfs that you can pin up in your kitchen, lots of photos and extra videos and you’ll have the opportunity to ask me questions too. . Boza is dairy-free, gluten-free, lectin-free, vegan, probiotic, tasty, easy and versatile. Have I convinced you yet that you’ll love it?! . Check the link in my profile to be taken to all the details.

If you fancy creating an ancient Turkish probiotic millet drink, Boza, in your kitchen (that is gluten-free, lectin-free, dairy-free and also happens to be vegan) then the first video course I’ve ever created is for you!
.
It’s up on my website now. There are 35+ minutes of video that’ll talk you through it, 2 downloadable .pdfs that you can pin up in your kitchen, lots of photos and extra videos and you’ll have the opportunity to ask me questions too.
.
Boza is dairy-free, gluten-free, lectin-free, vegan, probiotic, tasty, easy and versatile. Have I convinced you yet that you’ll love it?!
.
Check the link in my profile to be taken to all the details.

Read More

This is a Cornish Pasty. Well, not quite… . Yes, the ‘pasty’ format was inspired by where we used to live (Cornwall, in the UK)… . But: . The pastry is sourdough spelt, infused with layer upon layer of lard paste (made with left-over-from-rendering lard cracklings) inspired the Slovakian recipe I got from @almost bananas. . And the filling is slow-cooked mutton grass-fed on the Tuscan hillside (thank you @valledelsasso). . Prepared by one big English person with the help of one little English person (see my story for a shot of the little chef at work) in their Italian apartment kitchen. . Who needs boundaries when the eating is this good? Check my story if you want to see the process and a fatty-flaky-pastry moment.

This is a Cornish Pasty. Well, not quite…
.
Yes, the ‘pasty’ format was inspired by where we used to live (Cornwall, in the UK)…
.
But:
.
The pastry is sourdough spelt, infused with layer upon layer of lard paste (made with left-over-from-rendering lard cracklings) inspired the Slovakian recipe I got from @almost bananas.
.
And the filling is slow-cooked mutton grass-fed on the Tuscan hillside (thank you @valledelsasso).
.
Prepared by one big English person with the help of one little English person (see my story for a shot of the little chef at work) in their Italian apartment kitchen.
.
Who needs boundaries when the eating is this good? Check my story if you want to see the process and a fatty-flaky-pastry moment.

Read More

Underneath all those chives (can you tell I’m enthusiastic about my garden chives?!) is a stew made from mutton. . When I heard from my farmer, Flavio @valledelsasso, that grass-fed mutton was available, I jumped. I love anything that I can slow-cook (for convenience, yes, but equally, for flavour). Plus 100% grass-fed – yes, please! . There is no stigma, in this house, attached to ‘old’ meat. Why shouldn’t a sheep have a pleasant life on Flavio’s farm, being allowed to live, to nutrify the ground, to eat the grass and to provide wool? That seems a lot better than killing an young animal, just because it’s culturally fashionable (and easier to cook) that way. . I bought 3 kg. One of those went in this, it”ll last us 4/5 days. I’ve already decided that the next kilo will be cooked with beetroot and warming spices.

Underneath all those chives (can you tell I’m enthusiastic about my garden chives?!) is a stew made from mutton.
.
When I heard from my farmer, Flavio @valledelsasso, that grass-fed mutton was available, I jumped. I love anything that I can slow-cook (for convenience, yes, but equally, for flavour). Plus 100% grass-fed – yes, please!
.
There is no stigma, in this house, attached to ‘old’ meat. Why shouldn’t a sheep have a pleasant life on Flavio’s farm, being allowed to live, to nutrify the ground, to eat the grass and to provide wool? That seems a lot better than killing an young animal, just because it’s culturally fashionable (and easier to cook) that way.
.
I bought 3 kg. One of those went in this, it”ll last us 4/5 days. I’ve already decided that the next kilo will be cooked with beetroot and warming spices.

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We are so quickly habituated to eating what is culturally ‘normal’. Goat, in other, non-European parts of the world (and even in Europe just a few generations ago) was normal. Goats are used extensively in dairy farming and to a great extent their meat is wasted. . I wish we as a society, could take off our cultural glasses and look beyond what’s presented on the supermarket shelves. . Here’s my tuppenceworth (is that just and English-ism?!): Goat stew. The meat was fresh that day. I added lots of onions and cabbage and some left-over fermented lemons. It was cooked overnight in the slow cooker. . Thank you @aziendaagricolapodereruggeri

We are so quickly habituated to eating what is culturally ‘normal’. Goat, in other, non-European parts of the world (and even in Europe just a few generations ago) was normal. Goats are used extensively in dairy farming and to a great extent their meat is wasted.
.
I wish we as a society, could take off our cultural glasses and look beyond what’s presented on the supermarket shelves.
.
Here’s my tuppenceworth (is that just and English-ism?!): Goat stew. The meat was fresh that day. I added lots of onions and cabbage and some left-over fermented lemons. It was cooked overnight in the slow cooker.
.
Thank you @aziendaagricolapodereruggeri

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My oat fermentation team!! . In the middle are oats rolled from the whole grain yesterday (using a #marcatomarga hand grinder) that have been fermenting overnight with a blob of sourdough starter. See the band of water? That’s a sign of the vigorousness of the ferment. I’ll stir these and then transfer them to the fridge. They’ll be cooked up as porridge over the next 2-3 breakfasts. . Flanking them, on either side, are the ‘crumbs’ that were created when I rolled the oats. I sieved them off and am wild-fermenting them with a lot of water to make the Scottish ‘Sowans’ – which will give me both a drink and a porridge. . More pictures in my story today and a lot more details in my ‘Sowans’ highlight. . I’m going to record some simple videos later in the summer on oat fermentation so you can see all this in progress.

My oat fermentation team!!
.
In the middle are oats rolled from the whole grain yesterday (using a #marcatomarga hand grinder) that have been fermenting overnight with a blob of sourdough starter. See the band of water? That’s a sign of the vigorousness of the ferment. I’ll stir these and then transfer them to the fridge. They’ll be cooked up as porridge over the next 2-3 breakfasts.
.
Flanking them, on either side, are the ‘crumbs’ that were created when I rolled the oats. I sieved them off and am wild-fermenting them with a lot of water to make the Scottish ‘Sowans’ – which will give me both a drink and a porridge.
.
More pictures in my story today and a lot more details in my ‘Sowans’ highlight.
.
I’m going to record some simple videos later in the summer on oat fermentation so you can see all this in progress.

Read More

When the world gives you duff barley, make wild beer from rye. . Up till now, I’ve been making my 5,000 year-old beer from spelt, but I fancied giving barley a go because that’s the grain most traditional beers were made from. . I was all ready…but the barley didn’t sprout (even after I talked to it encouragingly!). Without sprouted grain (i.e. malted grain) there’s nothing for the little beer fermentation creatures to eat. . So quick change of plan and we’ve got a wild fermented rye beer on the go. . When I see the sprouts, like here, I remember how damn miraculous the process is. And the smell of malted grain is delicious. . I filmed each of the steps and they are in my story today. I’ll save them to the beer and bread highlight if you’re coming to this later. . Give me a few days and you can pop over for a taste…

When the world gives you duff barley, make wild beer from rye.
.
Up till now, I’ve been making my 5,000 year-old beer from spelt, but I fancied giving barley a go because that’s the grain most traditional beers were made from.
.
I was all ready…but the barley didn’t sprout (even after I talked to it encouragingly!). Without sprouted grain (i.e. malted grain) there’s nothing for the little beer fermentation creatures to eat.
.
So quick change of plan and we’ve got a wild fermented rye beer on the go.
.
When I see the sprouts, like here, I remember how damn miraculous the process is. And the smell of malted grain is delicious.
.
I filmed each of the steps and they are in my story today. I’ll save them to the beer and bread highlight if you’re coming to this later.
.
Give me a few days and you can pop over for a taste…

Read More

One of the biggest fears I had when I started taking steps to remove supermarkets from my life was that it was going to cost me more to buy from local suppliers. . A few years down the line, my experience has taught me some nuggets regarding food expenses. . The staples do not cost more *if* we are willing to change our daily habits and expectations. . Here’s our lunch. Sliced cow’s heart. . The heart, from @valledelsasso cost 15 Euro. That’s less than 18USD, 13GBP or 24AUD. Uncooked, it weighed 2.3kg. It has made 23 meals. That’s 65 Italian cents per serving. In addition, it has given us almost 4 litres (quarts) of the most amazing stock. . And this meat was raised by someone who *really* cares, just around the corner. Meat that looks ‘cheap’ in the supermarket isn’t. Someone or something has paid the price. Someone or something has been exploited. . In the latest episode of @ancestralkitchenpodcast I talk about my quest to detoxify my life of supermarkets. I get quite passionate. Luckily, @farmandhearth, my co-host, knows how to handle me! You can listen to us in Apple podcasts or by streaming from the link in my profile. . And, in case you were curious, also on the plate we have salad from our garden and the local farmers’ market with a dressing including nigella seeds and some spelt sourdough spread with home-rendered local lard.

One of the biggest fears I had when I started taking steps to remove supermarkets from my life was that it was going to cost me more to buy from local suppliers.
.
A few years down the line, my experience has taught me some nuggets regarding food expenses.
.
The staples do not cost more *if* we are willing to change our daily habits and expectations.
.
Here’s our lunch. Sliced cow’s heart.
.
The heart, from @valledelsasso cost 15 Euro. That’s less than 18USD, 13GBP or 24AUD. Uncooked, it weighed 2.3kg. It has made 23 meals. That’s 65 Italian cents per serving. In addition, it has given us almost 4 litres (quarts) of the most amazing stock.
.
And this meat was raised by someone who *really* cares, just around the corner. Meat that looks ‘cheap’ in the supermarket isn’t. Someone or something has paid the price. Someone or something has been exploited.
.
In the latest episode of @ancestralkitchenpodcast I talk about my quest to detoxify my life of supermarkets. I get quite passionate. Luckily, @farmandhearth, my co-host, knows how to handle me! You can listen to us in Apple podcasts or by streaming from the link in my profile.
.
And, in case you were curious, also on the plate we have salad from our garden and the local farmers’ market with a dressing including nigella seeds and some spelt sourdough spread with home-rendered local lard.

Read More

Have you eaten egg, bread and pesto together? . I did for supper yesterday: . Millet and sorghum sourdough spread with home-rendered lard (fat from @lavalledelsasso), topped with a fried egg, fried spring onions (both from @radiciumane at #mercatointransizione) and home-made pesto left over from the pizza-making session a few pictures back! . It was yum! . And it was completely Italian, mostly local, and also had a few bits from our garden in. It was definitely supermarket-free and that makes me feel good. . The latest @ancestralkitchenpodcast is on Quitting Supermarkets – listen in to hear me talk about why I want these places out of my life and how I’m doing with my quest. You can find the episode in your podcast app (search for Ancestral Kitchen) or by clicking on my profile link and streaming the episode from my website.

Have you eaten egg, bread and pesto together?
.
I did for supper yesterday:
.
Millet and sorghum sourdough spread with home-rendered lard (fat from @lavalledelsasso), topped with a fried egg, fried spring onions (both from @radiciumane at #mercatointransizione) and home-made pesto left over from the pizza-making session a few pictures back!
.
It was yum!
.
And it was completely Italian, mostly local, and also had a few bits from our garden in. It was definitely supermarket-free and that makes me feel good.
.
The latest @ancestralkitchenpodcast is on Quitting Supermarkets – listen in to hear me talk about why I want these places out of my life and how I’m doing with my quest. You can find the episode in your podcast app (search for Ancestral Kitchen) or by clicking on my profile link and streaming the episode from my website.

Read More