I'd like regular ancestral cooking emails!

Have you ever tried to make a dough from rolled oats? It’s not easy! The protein in oats, avenin, isn’t ‘sticky’ like gluten so you have to coax the grain into a dough with skill and a few ‘tricks’. . My tricks: I use warm water and add a little fat. It helps! Apparently my ancestors, the many inhabitants of the United Kingdom who did this before me, didn’t need tricks! The British equivalent of Italy’s ‘pasta grannies’, they whipped up crack-free oat dough with incredible sleight of hand, the technique locked in their muscle memory! . They then baked it into oatcakes. You can buy oatcakes in the UK (but who’d want to when the home version is so much better?!), but as I learnt from my co-host on @ancestralkitchenpodcast, @farmandhearth oatcakes aren’t really a ‘thing’ in the US. . They *are* very much a ‘thing’ in our house. I’m sharing the recipe (tricks and all) in my newsletter that’ll go out tomorrow. If you aren’t on my list, head to ancestralkitchen.com/newsletter (link in profile) to receive the recipe.

Have you ever tried to make a dough from rolled oats? It’s not easy! The protein in oats, avenin, isn’t ‘sticky’ like gluten so you have to coax the grain into a dough with skill and a few ‘tricks’.
.
My tricks: I use warm water and add a little fat. It helps! Apparently my ancestors, the many inhabitants of the United Kingdom who did this before me, didn’t need tricks! The British equivalent of Italy’s ‘pasta grannies’, they whipped up crack-free oat dough with incredible sleight of hand, the technique locked in their muscle memory!
.
They then baked it into oatcakes. You can buy oatcakes in the UK (but who’d want to when the home version is so much better?!), but as I learnt from my co-host on @ancestralkitchenpodcast, @farmandhearth oatcakes aren’t really a ‘thing’ in the US.
.
They *are* very much a ‘thing’ in our house. I’m sharing the recipe (tricks and all) in my newsletter that’ll go out tomorrow. If you aren’t on my list, head to ancestralkitchen.com/newsletter (link in profile) to receive the recipe.

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Elderberry medicine my way means no sweetener (it’s sweet enough) and not throwing the ‘spent’ berries away. . Here are four containers of elderberry tonic. The berries were simmered for 30 minutes (2 cups fresh/1 cup dried to 2 cups water). Instead of adding honey/sugar to keep them from going bad, I’m going to freeze them. . Behind the small containers, in the big jar, is an experimental ‘spent’ elderberry soda. I plopped the fruit remains in there, added water, a couple of spoons of dark sugar and a spoonful of whey. It’s now happily fermenting on my counter! . I’ll put some video of the bubbling in my stories.

Elderberry medicine my way means no sweetener (it’s sweet enough) and not throwing the ‘spent’ berries away.
.
Here are four containers of elderberry tonic. The berries were simmered for 30 minutes (2 cups fresh/1 cup dried to 2 cups water). Instead of adding honey/sugar to keep them from going bad, I’m going to freeze them.
.
Behind the small containers, in the big jar, is an experimental ‘spent’ elderberry soda. I plopped the fruit remains in there, added water, a couple of spoons of dark sugar and a spoonful of whey. It’s now happily fermenting on my counter!
.
I’ll put some video of the bubbling in my stories.

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Earlier this year I was interviewed by Jane over at @farmtofuture podcast. Jane’s now celebrating the first birthday of the podcast and giving away a stash of goodies, including a copy of my course on how to make the ancestral fermented drink, Boza. If you’d like to enter, check out Jane’s words and link in her bio! *** We’ve teamed up with a handful of amazing founders and their sustainable food brands, to gift you a few things to try in your kitchen! Farm to Future’s mission is to help you source food that’s better for the land, and we’re thrilled to partner with these up-and-coming brands who value the same 🤝😍 HOW TO ENTER Submit your email through the link in our bio by November 22. One winner will be randomly selected on November 23! PRIZES 🥓 Regenerative pork jerky + pork floss from @bonjerksnacks 🍄 Gourmet dehydrated mushrooms, mushroom powder, spice blends + mushroom hot cocoa from @sporeattic 🍫Fair Trade and certified Organic coffee bar sampler box from @coba.coffee (Check out their Kickstarter on now for 🆕 matcha, chai, and hojicha bars!) 🥣 Sample pack of Michigan-grown ancient grain teff granola from @eatteffola 🍶 @ancestral_kitchen video course on how to make your own probiotic Boza drink

Earlier this year I was interviewed by Jane over at @farmtofuture podcast.

Jane’s now celebrating the first birthday of the podcast and giving away a stash of goodies, including a copy of my course on how to make the ancestral fermented drink, Boza. If you’d like to enter, check out Jane’s words and link in her bio!

***

We’ve teamed up with a handful of amazing founders and their sustainable food brands, to gift you a few things to try in your kitchen! Farm to Future’s mission is to help you source food that’s better for the land, and we’re thrilled to partner with these up-and-coming brands who value the same 🤝😍

HOW TO ENTER
Submit your email through the link in our bio by November 22. One winner will be randomly selected on November 23!

PRIZES
🥓 Regenerative pork jerky + pork floss from @bonjerksnacks
🍄 Gourmet dehydrated mushrooms, mushroom powder, spice blends + mushroom hot cocoa from @sporeattic
🍫Fair Trade and certified Organic coffee bar sampler box from @coba.coffee (Check out their Kickstarter on now for 🆕 matcha, chai, and hojicha bars!)
🥣 Sample pack of Michigan-grown ancient grain teff granola from @eatteffola
🍶 @ancestral_kitchen video course on how to make your own probiotic Boza drink

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Melissa K Norris is a 5th-generation, self-sufficient homesteader with animals, vegetables, children, books, a podcast and so much more! . She’s not just living off the land, she’s thriving off it and this week’s episode will give you an insider view into her lifestyle, kitchen routines and motherhood philosophy. . Thank you @melissaknorris for sharing so much with us and thank you to my co-host @farmandhearth for quizzing Melissa on what we wanted to know! . You can listen to the episode by searching for @ancestralkitchenpodcast in your app, or you can stream/download from my website, link in profile.

Melissa K Norris is a 5th-generation, self-sufficient homesteader with animals, vegetables, children, books, a podcast and so much more!
.
She’s not just living off the land, she’s thriving off it and this week’s episode will give you an insider view into her lifestyle, kitchen routines and motherhood philosophy.
.
Thank you @melissaknorris for sharing so much with us and thank you to my co-host @farmandhearth for quizzing Melissa on what we wanted to know!
.
You can listen to the episode by searching for @ancestralkitchenpodcast in your app, or you can stream/download from my website, link in profile.

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What wonderful meal out have you tried to recreate at home? Was it a success? . Many months back I went to a sourdough pizza restaurant in Florence. I had a pizza spread with onions slow-cooked in chianti wine and then topped with gorgonzola. Oh my, it was good. . Finally I got round to trying something similar. I cooked sliced red onions for ages in olive oil the added a lot of red wine, cooking it down until the liquid had all gone. I spread that on my sourdough spelt pizza (recipe in profile) and topped with a local raw milk pecorino and the last of the basil from the garden. . It was very good. . Next on the list is the other delight I ate there – focaccia stuffed with head cheese :-) . So I want to hear from you! What have you tried to recreate? Did you have to guess the ingredients? Did it live up to your memory?!

What wonderful meal out have you tried to recreate at home? Was it a success?
.
Many months back I went to a sourdough pizza restaurant in Florence. I had a pizza spread with onions slow-cooked in chianti wine and then topped with gorgonzola. Oh my, it was good.
.
Finally I got round to trying something similar. I cooked sliced red onions for ages in olive oil the added a lot of red wine, cooking it down until the liquid had all gone. I spread that on my sourdough spelt pizza (recipe in profile) and topped with a local raw milk pecorino and the last of the basil from the garden.
.
It was very good.
.
Next on the list is the other delight I ate there – focaccia stuffed with head cheese 🙂
.
So I want to hear from you! What have you tried to recreate? Did you have to guess the ingredients? Did it live up to your memory?!

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If you are on the run in Florence and want some street food, one of your options is ‘Porchetta’. There are stalls selling it all over the city. It’s pork, rolled with spices, roasted, sliced and laid in the middle of a bread roll. . Here’s my home version with an ancestral twist. I roasted belly pork from @valledelsasso with fennel seeds, garlic, salt and pepper. Beet from the garden (thank you #bokashi compost!) roasted beautifully with some local beans under the pork, catching the juices. I then made a spelt sourdough focaccia with some cold oat porridge in the dough (makes it so soft – I’ll put more pics in my stories). We cut it, stuffed the sliced pork in and served with the veg, some gorgeous crackling and (as just in the distance you can see) some sauerkraut. . I love good street food, but I love sitting down at the table eating whilst the house still smells of roast pork and baking bread more!

If you are on the run in Florence and want some street food, one of your options is ‘Porchetta’. There are stalls selling it all over the city. It’s pork, rolled with spices, roasted, sliced and laid in the middle of a bread roll.
.
Here’s my home version with an ancestral twist. I roasted belly pork from @valledelsasso with fennel seeds, garlic, salt and pepper. Beet from the garden (thank you #bokashi compost!) roasted beautifully with some local beans under the pork, catching the juices. I then made a spelt sourdough focaccia with some cold oat porridge in the dough (makes it so soft – I’ll put more pics in my stories). We cut it, stuffed the sliced pork in and served with the veg, some gorgeous crackling and (as just in the distance you can see) some sauerkraut.
.
I love good street food, but I love sitting down at the table eating whilst the house still smells of roast pork and baking bread more!

Read More

Come Preparare il Kefir d’Acqua

Cosa serve? Un barattolo di vetro della grandezza di circa 1 litro con un coperchio o un tovagliolo con elastico per coprirlo Una bottiglia di vetro con un tappo ermetico Un colino abbastanza piccolo preferibilmente in plastica Un imbuto preferibilimente … Read MoreRead More