Have you eaten lungs before? This was my first time (and my son’s too!). Here we have goat offal – heart, lungs and liver – for three (and also, coincidentally, for free!). It was carried down the hill, from @aziendaagricolapodereruggeri but my hubby, Rob. I cooked it in lard with onion, fresh garlic, sage and a little meat stock. . We ate it with sourdough rye made from grains ground in our hand-crank mill, topped with home-rendered lard from pigs raised by @valledelsasso. . And there’s a salad with lettuce from @radiciumane at our local contadini market, #mercatointransizione . It was good. Why isn’t goat a more widespread?! I’ve got the flesh to cook too – planning a roast for the ribs and then a stew for the other cuts. . And if you’re curious, the lungs were light and fluffy with a delicate flavour. My 7-year-old approved. I’ll definitely cook them again. . More (raw and cooked) pictures in my story today and saved to nose-to-tail highlight.

Have you eaten lungs before? This was my first time (and my son’s too!). Here we have goat offal – heart, lungs and liver – for three (and also, coincidentally, for free!). It was carried down the hill, from @aziendaagricolapodereruggeri but my hubby, Rob. I cooked it in lard with onion, fresh garlic, sage and a little meat stock.
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We ate it with sourdough rye made from grains ground in our hand-crank mill, topped with home-rendered lard from pigs raised by @valledelsasso.
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And there’s a salad with lettuce from @radiciumane at our local contadini market, #mercatointransizione
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It was good. Why isn’t goat a more widespread?! I’ve got the flesh to cook too – planning a roast for the ribs and then a stew for the other cuts.
.
And if you’re curious, the lungs were light and fluffy with a delicate flavour. My 7-year-old approved. I’ll definitely cook them again.
.
More (raw and cooked) pictures in my story today and saved to nose-to-tail highlight.

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It’s getting warm here. Summer’s arrived. Still the oven’s up high for pizza. I can’t go a whole Italian summer without it! . This is a sourdough spelt base, cooked on a pizza stone. The recipe’s in my profile and includes videos on how to stretch and fold and how to shape. . The recipe has been called “the best pizza I’ve ever eaten” by an IG friend. If you make it, let me know how it goes!

It’s getting warm here. Summer’s arrived. Still the oven’s up high for pizza. I can’t go a whole Italian summer without it!
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This is a sourdough spelt base, cooked on a pizza stone. The recipe’s in my profile and includes videos on how to stretch and fold and how to shape.
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The recipe has been called “the best pizza I’ve ever eaten” by an IG friend. If you make it, let me know how it goes!

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See those little holes in the mixture before I stir? They’re a sure sign there are plenty of probiotic bacteria in this millet ferment, Boza. . Another day or so and this’ll be delicious to drink. Once it’s done I’ll keep it in the fridge and it’ll last us a week that way. A week of tangy, tasty, fizzy Boza. . Course on this coming soon!

See those little holes in the mixture before I stir? They’re a sure sign there are plenty of probiotic bacteria in this millet ferment, Boza.
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Another day or so and this’ll be delicious to drink. Once it’s done I’ll keep it in the fridge and it’ll last us a week that way. A week of tangy, tasty, fizzy Boza.
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Course on this coming soon!

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Lard on spent beer grain bread. . The lard was home-rendered with fat from @valledelsasso. The grains in the bread (which previously made beer) are organic, Italian, from @spaccio_bio_molinorosso. . The love, devotion and craft that’s gone into growing/raising these food stuffs, into the selling of them, into their kitchen processing elevates them to something more than food. . And that something nourishes us. We know it’s come from cared-for land and animals, through hands of those that give a damn, paid over-the-odds for by a family who don’t have spare cash, and then been part of a creative, manual process. . This feeds our souls just as much as the nutrients feed our cells. . Thank you Flavio for the fat. Thank you all at Molino Rosso for the grains. Thank you WAPF for starting me on this journey. Thank you Sandor Kraut for the beer recipe. And thank you, my reader, for encouraging me to share my little kitchen here.

Lard on spent beer grain bread.
.
The lard was home-rendered with fat from @valledelsasso. The grains in the bread (which previously made beer) are organic, Italian, from @spaccio_bio_molinorosso.
.
The love, devotion and craft that’s gone into growing/raising these food stuffs, into the selling of them, into their kitchen processing elevates them to something more than food.
.
And that something nourishes us. We know it’s come from cared-for land and animals, through hands of those that give a damn, paid over-the-odds for by a family who don’t have spare cash, and then been part of a creative, manual process.
.
This feeds our souls just as much as the nutrients feed our cells.
.
Thank you Flavio for the fat. Thank you all at Molino Rosso for the grains. Thank you WAPF for starting me on this journey. Thank you Sandor Kraut for the beer recipe. And thank you, my reader, for encouraging me to share my little kitchen here.

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I used to be a big drinker. In my 20s. I’d just ‘escaped’ from the prison of being grossly overweight and living as a square peg in a round hole. I swung onto the big job, snazzy car, expensive wine etc path. . Luckily, it didn’t satisfy for too long, and I grew desperate to find something more meaningful. . That journey involved taking responsibility for my health. It wasn’t something I imposed on myself, however. It grew out of my creativity; it was part of wanting to feel better so I could actually do the things I was passionate about. . I remember buying a bottle of Verve Cliquot for a New Year and then leaving it untouched. Wow. After that, 10 years went by and I didn’t drink. . Finding ancient beer is proving an amazing education. It feels so right to be making it. With local grains, sourdough and lots of love. Then using the leftovers to make bread. What else could I do, other than drink some? It tastes unlike any drink I’ve ever had. It makes my meals go down better. And, until some measuring equipment proves me wrong, I’m going to say it’s not very alcoholic. . Every so often, the last year or so, my hubby has bought a local bottle of wine to drink. Since I’ve been making the beer, he’s not thought about it once. Even my 7-year old loves his tiny sips. . Here’s the latest three bottles ready for their second fermentation. They’ll rest for a day or so like this until we gently pour some beer out, careful not to disturb the spelt sediment at the bottom, which I’ll later cook up as porridge. . I’ll never be a big drinker again. But I don’t think l’ll stop making or drinking this either :-)

I used to be a big drinker. In my 20s. I’d just ‘escaped’ from the prison of being grossly overweight and living as a square peg in a round hole. I swung onto the big job, snazzy car, expensive wine etc path.
.
Luckily, it didn’t satisfy for too long, and I grew desperate to find something more meaningful.
.
That journey involved taking responsibility for my health. It wasn’t something I imposed on myself, however. It grew out of my creativity; it was part of wanting to feel better so I could actually do the things I was passionate about.
.
I remember buying a bottle of Verve Cliquot for a New Year and then leaving it untouched. Wow. After that, 10 years went by and I didn’t drink.
.
Finding ancient beer is proving an amazing education. It feels so right to be making it. With local grains, sourdough and lots of love. Then using the leftovers to make bread. What else could I do, other than drink some? It tastes unlike any drink I’ve ever had. It makes my meals go down better. And, until some measuring equipment proves me wrong, I’m going to say it’s not very alcoholic.
.
Every so often, the last year or so, my hubby has bought a local bottle of wine to drink. Since I’ve been making the beer, he’s not thought about it once. Even my 7-year old loves his tiny sips.
.
Here’s the latest three bottles ready for their second fermentation. They’ll rest for a day or so like this until we gently pour some beer out, careful not to disturb the spelt sediment at the bottom, which I’ll later cook up as porridge.
.
I’ll never be a big drinker again. But I don’t think l’ll stop making or drinking this either 🙂

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Does it get much more beautiful than bread crust? . Especially not when it’s fresh from the oven in your own home. . This is home-made, wild fermented, local grain – spelt and chestnut flours. Mixed and encouraged by my own hands; baking smell filling my kitchen. . I hope I’m still baking in my last days. . More pics and some videos in my stories.

Does it get much more beautiful than bread crust?
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Especially not when it’s fresh from the oven in your own home.
.
This is home-made, wild fermented, local grain – spelt and chestnut flours. Mixed and encouraged by my own hands; baking smell filling my kitchen.
.
I hope I’m still baking in my last days.
.
More pics and some videos in my stories.

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This is what a whole cow’s heart looks like after a day in the slow cooker. I picked up this from my #farmerman Flavio @valledelsasso, washed it, then put it straight into the stock pot with water, a large carrot and an onion. . It cooked overnight. It is meltingly-soft and will slice really easily. I know from previous experience that it freezes well too. . This heart, from a cow treated amazingly, weighed 2.3kg. It’ll feed my family for over a week. It cost 15 Euros (13 Pounds/18 Dollars). . Food good for us, our community and the environment is not expensive and does not require tonnes of prep. . If you’re thinking of cooking heart but are unsure, let me know. I want you to, and if I can help, I will.

This is what a whole cow’s heart looks like after a day in the slow cooker. I picked up this from my #farmerman Flavio @valledelsasso, washed it, then put it straight into the stock pot with water, a large carrot and an onion.
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It cooked overnight. It is meltingly-soft and will slice really easily. I know from previous experience that it freezes well too.
.
This heart, from a cow treated amazingly, weighed 2.3kg. It’ll feed my family for over a week. It cost 15 Euros (13 Pounds/18 Dollars).
.
Food good for us, our community and the environment is not expensive and does not require tonnes of prep.
.
If you’re thinking of cooking heart but are unsure, let me know. I want you to, and if I can help, I will.

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I got bought a bread bin! And how beautiful is it?! . Despite baking my socks off for several years, I’ve never quite found the right bread bin…and kinda thought they were a luxury when I’ve a lot of food storage containers hanging around. . Obviously, I was waiting for this @larsnysom_official gift from the wonderful @barbaralovito, who I’ve known since long before my son was born. Thank you, Barbara! . It’s beautiful and fits perfectly in the spot where I keep our breads. It’s got a bamboo lid with slicing guide (that I don’t want to mess up!) and little holes in the metal sides for optimum air flow. . A vid in my stories :-) . What do you keep your bread in?

I got bought a bread bin! And how beautiful is it?!
.
Despite baking my socks off for several years, I’ve never quite found the right bread bin…and kinda thought they were a luxury when I’ve a lot of food storage containers hanging around.
.
Obviously, I was waiting for this @larsnysom_official gift from the wonderful @barbaralovito, who I’ve known since long before my son was born. Thank you, Barbara!
.
It’s beautiful and fits perfectly in the spot where I keep our breads. It’s got a bamboo lid with slicing guide (that I don’t want to mess up!) and little holes in the metal sides for optimum air flow.
.
A vid in my stories 🙂
.
What do you keep your bread in?

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If you love sourdough (whether you’re a wannabe, part-time or full-on baker), you’ll enjoy the latest @ancestralkitchenpodcast: It’s dedicated to the wonder that is wild yeast bread. . We talk the whys, the history, recipes, methods, starters, support and much more. . You can find us by searching for Ancestral Kitchen in your podcast provider or stream the episode from my site (link in profile)

If you love sourdough (whether you’re a wannabe, part-time or full-on baker), you’ll enjoy the latest @ancestralkitchenpodcast: It’s dedicated to the wonder that is wild yeast bread.
.
We talk the whys, the history, recipes, methods, starters, support and much more.
.
You can find us by searching for Ancestral Kitchen in your podcast provider or stream the episode from my site (link in profile)

Read More