I'd like regular ancestral cooking emails!
From Instagram
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I just wrote a piece on my five favourite kitchen tools for the soon-to-be-born @ancestralkitchenpodcast cookbook.
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I included the beautiful wooden chopping board that is underneath this pizza (it raises my low work surface about 3 inches which, for someone who is nearly 6 foot, is heaven sent). But I didn’t have space to wax lyrical about the pizza stone and the pizza peel that helped bring this sourdough spelt pizza to my table (even though they bring so much pizza-fuelled joy to my kitchen).
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My home is tiny…the kitchen, and it’s accessories (even though I don’t have many!) take up way more space than is ‘normal’. Just like food takes up way more space in my head than ‘normal’. But then, we get to eat *such* amazing meals. It’s worth it!
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Sourdough pizza recipe is in my profile if you’re in need of pizza this weekend!
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Wooden board, pizza stone and pizza peel optional 😉

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From Instagram
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Do you want to know how to transition your kitchen to ancestral methods? Maybe you’ve tried before? Perhaps you have the Nourishing Traditions cookbook, but feel so overwhelmed that you don’t know where to go next?
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In today’s episode of @ancestralkitchenpodcast (#50), we will make it easy for you! Listen in for a road map of twenty steps that will take you from a standard diet to a beautiful nourishing ancestral one; we’ll detail them all, tell you how we both started and give you many resources to help your journey!
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You can download the free printable ’20 Steps To An Ancestral Kitchen’ from www.ancestralkitchen.com/20steps. The link is in my profile.
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This is our 50th episode!! Thank you to everyone for listening, sharing and sending us such wonderful and interesting messages. We hope your enjoy our half century 🙂

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#50 – 20 Small Steps to an Ancestral Kitchen
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Do you want to know how to transition your kitchen and your eating to ancestral methods? Maybe you’ve tried before or stopped and started multiple times? Perhaps you have the Nourishing Traditions cookbook, but feel so overwhelmed that you don’t know where to go next? In this episode, we will make it easy for you!… Read More

From Instagram
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Have you ever tried an olive straight from the tree?
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They’re incredibly bitter, verging on inedible!
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These olives have been on my counter in a large bowl of water for nearly 2 months (and if you’ve seen the size of my kitchen you’ll know how difficult that’s been!). I’ve been changing the water every day. This leeches the bitterness from them.
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Now I’m putting them into a herbed brine and will leave them for at least 6 weeks before tasting.
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This is an age-old Italian tradition called olive in salamoia. The ‘sal’ referring to salt and the ‘muria’ being the latin for brine.
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Is the first time I’ve ever done it. And as with so many of my kitchen processes, I need patience – because I want to eat these now!

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From Instagram
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This is a recipe from the 1929 book ‘The Scots Kitchen’ (check my story today to see it) for Scottish scones made with sowans, the oat fermentation.
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The first thing I noticed biting in is that they are seriously squidgy, with a satisfying firmness! That’s important, right? After that came the tang (from the ferment) and the flash of the odd caraway seed.
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I ate with butter – the scones have holes in them (a bit like English crumpets) perfect for melting butter.
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I’m hoping to add this scone recipe to my sowans course over at @thefermentationschool. There’s a link to my course in my profile if you’re curious.

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Sourdough Oatcakes
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Oatcakes were the one of the staple foods of the Scottish, Welsh, Irish and nothern English populations long before the advent of the more modern grain, wheat. The ‘cake’ in their name may make our modern minds think that they … Read More

Chocolate-Covered Fermented Chestnuts
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These are the most amazing treat I’ve ever come up with. You’ll love them, I promise! If you want to make your own bean-to-bar chocolate to cover them in, check out my course here

From Instagram
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Sourdough oatcakes.
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In researching Scottish oats (for a forthcoming article in the Weston Price journal) I was surprised to learn that the Scottish did not pre-soak or ferment the oats that they used for their staple ‘bread’ – oatcakes.
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In my kitchen, anything that stands still for too long gets fermented, especially grains! So despite loving the standard Scottish oatcake, I really wanted to have a go at creating a fermented, sourdough version.
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Here is the result. It’s got all the creaminess of oats, and fresh from the pan it’s crunchy. But the sour tang of the ferment makes it almost cheesy too! Warm, with salted butter, these have become a go-to breakfast the last few weeks!
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The recipe will go out in my newsletter tomorrow. If you’re not on my list and you want to get it, go to ancestralkitchen.com/newsletter (link in my profile).

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